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Going on Vacation? Think about Travel Vaccines

Aedes aegypti, National Library of Medicine As summer heats up, families, vacationers, and honeymooners are rushing to travel clinics for their last-minute shots before embarking on their adventures. Here’s a quick guide to what you should keep in mind when getting any needed travel vaccines: Go Early – Vaccines require a certain amount of time to build up immunity in your body to protect against disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that you make an appointment 4-6 weeks before your scheduled departure. Moreover, many vaccines such as the hepatitis B vaccine and typhoid fever vaccine require multiple doses that must be spaced out for maximum effectiveness. More

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Vaccination Reminder Systems

From CDC Have you ever forgotten to buy milk when you go to the grocery store? How about missing someone’s birthday? Because of the fast-paced world we live in, there are always going to be things that we forget to do. Some of them are more important than others. Bills need to be paid on time or we get fees charged to us. Applications need to be filed on time or we could miss out on an opportunity. Vaccines need to be given on time to offer the best chances of their providing immunity. More

Historia de las Vacunas: ¡Ahora en español!

Dr. Jaime Ferrán y su vacuna contra el cólera, NLM Nos complace informar a nuestros lectores que hemos añadido una nueva y significativa sección a nuestro sitio A partir de hoy, publicaremos contenido en español para nuestros numerosos visitantes de habla hispana. Para acceder a una lista completa del contenido en español, haga clic en la etiqueta “Español” en la parte superior de la página, o, cuando vea contenido en inglés que tenga una versión en español, use el botón “en español” para cambiar de versión. More

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The Modern American Vaccine Debate 4/24

The History of Vaccines invites you to attend The Wistar Institute Authors Series program “The Modern American Vaccine Debate.” The event will be held Tuesday, April 24, at 6:30 pm at The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University in Philadelphia. It is presented as part of the Philadelphia Science Festival. Panelists include Paul Offit, MD, Mark Largent, PhD, Hildegund Ertl, MD, and Jason Schwartz, MBE. The event is free, but registration is required. We hope to see you there – the History of Vaccines will be exhibiting at the event. More

U.S. Cell Line Facility to Produce Pandemic Influenza Vaccine

Influenza virion, CDC/Cynthia Goldsmith A Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, Inc., manufacturing facility in North Carolina has geared up to produce pandemic influenza vaccine made from mammalian cell lines, rather than from the traditional hen egg-based methods that have been used for more than 50 years. The plant, open since November 2009, was dedicated in a December 12 ceremony after Novartis submitted a Biological License Application for the vaccine to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The cell-based system and production methods are similar to those that have been licensed and used for seasonal influenza vaccine in Europe since 2007. More

Plotkin on CSPAN

Rubella vaccine developer and History of Vaccines advisor Stanley A. Plotkin, MD, appeared on CSPAN's Washington Journal on Thursday, 11/3/2011, to discuss the history of vaccination and the government's role in regulating vaccines. Dr. Plotkin described the long history of vaccination (and early immunization practices) in colonial America and United States, beginning with smallpox variolation. A number of callers then phoned in with questions about vaccine safety, how vaccines are tested, and whether Andrew Wakefield's work attempting to link MMR vaccination to autism has been vindicated. He also countered one caller's claim that new childhood vaccines are not tested as part of the complete immunization schedule by describing concomitant use studies that ensure that safety and immunogenicity are not compromised with the addition of new vaccines. More

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Plotkin on CSPAN's Washington Journal 11/3

Stanley A. Plotkin, 1970s Stanley A. Plotkin, MD, vaccine developer and History of Vaccines advisor, will appear Thursday, 11/3, on C-SPAN's Washington Journal around 9:15 am EDT. Dr. Plotkin will be discussing the history of vaccination and the role of the governement in supporting research and regulating vaccine production. You can watch live on C-SPAN, or live online at http://www.c-span.org/Series/Washington-Journal/. This is a call-in program, so please phone in to ask Dr. Plotkin questions about the history of vaccines. The program will be archived at the Washington Journal website, so if you miss the live show, you'll be able to view it later. More

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ACIP Votes to Recommend Routine HPV Vaccination for Boys

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been recommended as part of the routine vaccination schedule for girls aged 11-12 since 2006 for the prevention of cervical cancer. In 2009, the FDA licensed the vaccine for use in males aged 9-26 years for the prevention of genital warts caused by two types of HPV, but the vaccine was not yet recommended for boys as part of the routine immunization schedule.

Meeting today at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices voted to recommend routine immunization against HPV for boys at age 11-12. ACIP members, experts selected by the Secretary of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, develop the recommendations that are used in the U.S. Recommended Childhood, Adolescent and Adult Immunization Schedules. More

An Infectious Diseases Doctor Views Contagion

1918 Influenza Scrapbook, The College of Physicians of Philadelphia Going to the movies is a time-honored way of getting away from the vagaries of work and home life and inhabiting a different and exotic place. I don’t know if car mechanics can really enjoy chase movies or cowboys can appreciate Westerns, but as a specialist in Infectious Diseases, I rarely get a chance to see someone plying my trade inside the multiplex. There are spoilers ahead, so read on cautiously if you have not yet seen Contagion and plan to go.

The new Steven Soderbergh movie, Contagion, is a fairly realistic guesstimate of what might happen if a highly contagious, new infectious agent started moving around the world and destroying people willy nilly like a marauding tornado. While there has never been an infection quite like “MEV-1” as depicted in Contagion, the question of how we would respond as a medical community and as a society is a worthy one to address. Whether the answer is right or wrong – well, let’s hope we never find out.

From an Infectious Diseases angle, the infection in Contagion is crafted to be highly transmissible and fatal. This would be like a hybrid of the 1918-1919 pandemic flu, Nipah virus and SARS. The end of the movie shows the mechanism via which MEV-1 began to infect humans, and it is highly reminiscent of Nipah and SARS. Thus has some built-in credibility as it builds on diseases that we already understand. It is also eerily reminiscent of the most recent big flu outbreak (A/California/2009 H1N1) where the virus contained elements that came from birds, pigs and people. The rapidity of spread lends the movie much of its terror, but is not far off the rapidity of spread of influenza. Similarly, the incubation period and time to death is also reminiscent of the 1918-1919 pandemic flu. So the film-makers have done their homework and created a plausible disaster scenario. More

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Vaccine Meetings Discuss Challenges, Achievements

Two important vaccine meetings were held September 11 and 12 at The College of Physicians of Philadelphia. The September 12 meeting entitled Research Integrity Challenges in Vaccine Development and Distribution for Public Health Emergencies was sponsored by the Department of Health and Human Services, the Office of Research Integrity, Drexel University, University of Pennsylvania Center for Bioethics, and The College of Physicians of Philadelphia. Speakers focused on vaccine development and distribution for biological threats and how the emergency preparedness experiences with A/H1N1 provided lessons that might inform future preparation for similar public health emergencies. More