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From ID Week: Adult Immunization Barriers and Promoters

How is the immune system similar to your marathon time? As we age, our immune response decreases at the same slope that our marathon race times increase. Presenters laid out this and some of the other problems of immunizing adults in the Symposium on Adult Immunizations, an early session at the Infectious Diseases Society 2014 conference at the Philadelphia Convention Center. Kenneth Schmader, MD, noted that though adults age differently – some adults at age 75 may be running marathons while others may be frail – all are subject to immune system senescence, and all are vulnerable to rapid functional declines that may result from an acute stressor, whether it’s a fall or a debilitating case pneumococcal pneumonia. More

Vaccine Disaster in Syria: Historical Precedents

Diphtheria AT, 1920s, Lederle The news of infant deaths on September 16 in northern Syria from measles vaccination is heartbreaking. Shortly after vaccination, the children became limp and unresponsive: those most severely affected died before reaching hospital. Seventy-five children were affected, and fifteen died. The World Health Organization is investigating the incident. The first reports couldn't identify the problem and speculated that the vaccine had spoiled or that it had been tampered with. The latest reports state that atracurium, a neuromuscular blocking agent used in procedures like intubation, was used as a diluent for measles vaccine, rather than the standard water-based diluent. More

Brad Pitt Takes on the Zombie Virus

Drexel zombies from blogs.CDC.gov Many thanks to my great high school interns Arkiea and Mercedes for writing this review and summary of World War Z. When I first heard about World War Z I thought “ugh, another zombie movie.” It was a movie that I did not want to see because honestly I hate zombie movies. Almost all zombie movies have the same plot where it's people awakening from their grave to become a brain-eating zombie. Not that I’m against that, it’s just I did not want to sit through another movie that’s two hours long for eleven dollars just so I can predict the outcome. So, I decided to avoid World War Z at all costs, meaning that I stayed home on a Saturday night while my dad and sister went to the movies. Three hours later my sister returns home and she tries to persuade me to see the movie but because of my stubbornness and utter dislike for zombies, I tell her no. After months of listening to my sister rant about the movie, I finally decide it would be in our best interests if I saw the movie. More

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When Bad News Is Good News

Haemophilus influenzae, (c) Dennis Kunkel Microscopy, Inc. Our advisor, Thomas Fekete, MD, FCPP, wrote today’s post. Dr. Fekete, a frequent contributor to this site and an active Fellow here at the College, has many responsibilities at Temple University Hospital and School of Medicine: Section Chief, Infectious Diseases; Professor, Medicine; Associate Professor, Microbiology and Immunology; and Executive Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs, Department of Medicine. Twenty-plus years ago, an improved (protein-conjugated) vaccine for Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was approved and deployed extensively in young children in most developed countries. There was a rapid and sustained drop in serious infections caused by Hib. This reduction of meningitis, pneumonia, blood infections, and so on was dramatic and was accompanied by a major reduction in the formerly common and seemingly innocent carriage of Hib in the throats of children. As a result, even unvaccinated children had protection from Hib via herd immunity. More

Vaccine Skepticism as a Feminist Stance?

The Historical Medical Library of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia Elena Conis published a recent essay in the Bulletin of the History of Medicine, entitled “A Mother’s Responsibility: Women, Medicine, and the Rise of Contemporary Vaccine Skepticism in the United States.” I had heard Conis give a talk on this same topic at a conference a few years earlier, and some her claims didn’t sit well with me. In the BHM piece, she looks at vaccine resistance beginning in the 1970s and 1980s and traces its origins to second-wave feminism and its critical view of the medical establishment. Her argument is that at a time when women were still being asked to be guardians of their children’s health – uniquely in a position to protect and care for their children in what was still an almost Victorian model of motherhood – feminist notions of self-care and self-empowerment conflicted with medical practice around vaccination. Parents, particularly mothers, began to question received medical notions about vaccination – that benefits of disease prevention almost always outweighed the risks of vaccination. In publications as extremely back-to-nature as Mothering and as conventional as Dear Abby columns, women discussed the need for vaccination and worried about medical side effects More

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American Presidents and Infectious Diseases

We've expanded and updated a popular post from 2012 by History of Vaccines former intern Alexandra Linn. Happy Fourth of July! In honor of this historic U.S. holiday, we’ve compiled a list showing how infectious diseases have affected the lives of our most heralded leaders – the American presidents. These concise accounts are evidence that diseases can strike anyone, anywhere at any time, and even in the White House. More

Video: Do Vaccines Overwhelm the Infant Immune System?

Courtesy Academic Earth AcademicEarth, an educational video and online course provider, has just produced a video for its collection of video electives-–standalone videos that illustrate interesting concepts across a variety of disciplines.In this video, they take on the “too many, too soon” argument often made by vaccine objectors: that receiving multiple vaccines at one time is harmful to a baby or child. The narrator tries to estimate total antigen exposure to age 18 and then compares that figure with antigen exposure via vaccination to age 6. More

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C. Everett Koop 1916-2013

C. Everett Koop. The College of Physicians of Philadelphia It is with great sadness that we learn of the death of our long-time Fellow and Presidential Advisor, C. Everett Koop, MD, ScD. Dr. Koop was more than a colleague: he was a mentor, advisor, and teacher, but most importantly, our brother and friend. His dedication to our profession and service to this College helped us all better understand what it means to be part of medicine.  His compassion for his patients taught us how to be good and caring physicians. More

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Plotkin and Offit in Top Ten Most Influential in Vaccines

Stanley A. Plotkin, MD. Courtesy Dr. Plotkin What does the following list mean to you? Bill Gates, Stanley Plotkin, Rino Rappouli, Melinda Gates, Seth Berkley, Paul Offit, Suresh Jadhav, Ted Bianco, Ciro de Quadro, Gordon Dougan. Followers of the blog and LinkedIn group Vaccine Nation chose the ten as the most influential people in the vaccine world. Vaccine Nation is run by Terrapinn, a media company that sponsors conferences on, among other things, vaccines and orphan drugs. The full list of vaccine influencers is 50 names long, and includes individuals in academia and research institutes, industry, NGOs and nonprofits, and government. More

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History of Vaccines Publishes Book

The History of Vaccines, available at Amazon.com As of today, The History of Vaccines has published a book. This book has been in the making for the past few months and features new material and material adapted from the History of Vaccines website. The book showcases more than 40 illustrations and photographs, many of them drawn from the Historical Medical Library here at The College of Physicians of Philadelphia. It was generously funded by an independent educational grant from Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. More

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